Epoxy Overcoat
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CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat (Adhesive Syringe)

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CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat (Adhesive Syringe)

CircuitWorks® Epoxy Overcoat is a two component, 100% solids, high temperature resistant, permanent epoxy coating for electronics circuit and component protection. When properly cured, CircuitWorks® Epoxy Overcoat yields a chemically inert film which prevents the effects of corrosion, moisture, oxidation, abrasion, and thermal shock. The cured film can withstand brief exposure to high temperatures up to 600º F.

Features & Benefits

  • Provides a tough, protective, green coating
  • Outstanding thermal and chemical resistance
  • Excellent dielectric properties; helps prevent electrical discharge
  • Provides superior protection against moisture and abrasion
  • Resists reflow temperatures
  • Service temperature from -55 to 192ºF (-48 to 89ºC)
    Short Term Exposure:  600ºF (315 ºC) for 1 minute
  • Meets the requirements of IPC-7721, 2.4.1

Applications

  • Ideal for pre-reflow solder resist repair
  • Electrically insulative coating helps prevent electrical discharge
  • Will not be removed by solvent cleaners

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Part # Size Units Per Case Price Per Case Add To Cart
CW2500

Adhesive Syringe: 4 g (0.14 oz.); Hardener Syringe 3.4 g (.12 oz), in blister pack

12 blister packs $229.44
Order from an authorized distributor

FAQ's

Can CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat withstand soldering temperature?

Yes. When soldering is required after the repair has been done, Chemtronics offers CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat (CW2500). It is a permanent green coating formulated to protect circuit traces before being exposed to reflow conditions. Epoxy Overcoat two component, 100% solids epoxy that is engineered specifically for high temperature resistance, used for electronic circuit and component protection. CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat can withstand service temperature between -55°F and 600°F (-48°C and 315°C), and meets IPC-7721.2.4.1 requirements.

How do you repair a PCB crack or open area of the solder resist on a PCB?

This answer assumes the crack does not impact surface or inner-layer traces. CircuitWorks Overcoat Epoxy provides a rugged repairs that can actually reinforce PCB areas with more structural cracks. 

Why is solder mask / resist / overcoat green?

Printed circuit boards (PCB) come in a variety of colors, including green, blue, red, brown, and even purple. The most common is green, but that can vary by application, industry, and the age of the PCB. Fashions change over time, and so do common PCB colors. Today, green is the most common. The reason? Not for any significant performance difference. Arguable, some colors may be easier on the eyes when assembling, soldering and reworking electronics, or work better with inspection optics. In reality, the main reason is probably price. Whatever is most common color will generally have lower cost, because bareboard suppliers are running that color continuously. Any odd color will require a change-over, extra clean-up, and thus additional cost.

How do I figure out the shelf life of a product?

The shelf life of a product can be found on either the technical data sheet (TDS), available on the product page, or by looking on the certificate on conformance (COC). The COC can be downloaded by going to https://www.chemtronics.com/coc. Once you have the shelf life, you will need to add it to the manufacture date for a use-by date. The manufacture date can be identified by the batch number. The batch code used on most of our products are manufacture dates in the Julian Date format. The format is YYDDD, where YY = year, DDD = day. For example, 19200 translates to the 200th day of 2019, or July 19, 2019. This webpage explains and provides charts to help interpret our batch numbers: https://www.chemtronics.com/batch-codes.

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