Overcoat Repair

Overcoat Repair
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Overcoat Repair

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Repair Scratches, Chips & Even Structural Cracks in PCB Solder Resist Overcoat

Repair scratches and chips in PCB solder resist with Overcoat Pens. They are available in multiple colors, to match the current overcoat as much as possible. Overcoat Epoxy provides a rugged repairs that can actually reinforce PCB areas with more structural cracks.

CircuitWorks® brand’s comprehensive line of conveniently packaged and precision dispensing rework and repair products makes circuit board repair and prototyping faster, easier and more accurate. Advanced-formula materials packaged in unique delivery systems ensure superior performance and pinpoint accuracy. The full range of products meets all of the technicians needs for electronics rework and prototyping — repairing, cleaning, protecting, lubricating, bonding, and restoring electrical conductivity to circuit boards and components.


CircuitWorks® Products are compliant with IPC-7711 Rework of Electronic Assemblies, and ANSI/J-STD-001.

Choose Your Product


CircuitWorks Epoxy Overcoat (Adhesive Syringe)
Tough, thermally stable, epoxy protective conformal coating

CircuitWorks Overcoat Pens
Pen dispenser for precise application of a tough protective acrylic conformal coating

FAQ's

How do you repair a PCB crack or open area of the solder resist on a PCB?

This answer assumes the crack does not impact surface or inner-layer traces. CircuitWorks Overcoat Epoxy provides a rugged repairs that can actually reinforce PCB areas with more structural cracks. 

How do I patch the conformal coating after a PCB repair?

Chemtronics offers CircuitWorks Overcoat Pens in a variety of colors to match the PCB resist. Overcoat pens are basically acrylic conformal coating in convenient packaging, and the clear version can be used to coat small areas. Simply press down the pen tip and squeeze the barrel to dispense the coating material. 

Why is solder mask / resist / overcoat green?

Printed circuit boards (PCB) come in a variety of colors, including green, blue, red, brown, and even purple. The most common is green, but that can vary by application, industry, and the age of the PCB. Fashions change over time, and so do common PCB colors. Today, green is the most common. The reason? Not for any significant performance difference. Arguable, some colors may be easier on the eyes when assembling, soldering and reworking electronics, or work better with inspection optics. In reality, the main reason is probably price. Whatever is most common color will generally have lower cost, because bareboard suppliers are running that color continuously. Any odd color will require a change-over, extra clean-up, and thus additional cost.

Articles


Ultimate Guide to Benchtop PCB Rework & Repair

The reality is that no soldering operation produces perfect assemblies every time. Even the highest quality components fail from time-to-time. That’s why understanding the best rework and repair methods and materials is so important for those who manufacture, maintain, or repair printed ci...
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