Pow-R-Wash Delta
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Pow-R-Wash Delta

Pow-R-Wash™ Delta electronics contact cleaner is a highly effective solvent cleaner for electrical and electronic components and assemblies. Nonflammable, and compatible with most metals and plastics found in electronic assemblies, it is safe on energized equipment, fast drying and has excellent solvency for oil, grease, dirt.

Contact cleaners restore electrical continuity to all electronic and electrical contacts by penetrating and removing insulating oil & grease, conductive carbon soil, and isolative oxides from contact surfaces. By restoring full circuit continuity, Chemtronics contact cleaners improve the performance of electronic equipment that relies on electrical contacts.

CLICK HERE FOR CONTACT CLEANER SELECTION GUIDE

Features & Benefits

  • Nonflammable and fast drying
  • Best AK225 replacement chemistry
  • Fast drying
  • Dielectric breakdown 30 kV
  • May be used on energized equipment
  • Excellent material compatibility
  • Displaces moisture and leaves no residues
  • No ozone depleting compounds, low VOC and GWP

Applications

  • Removes carbon dust from circuit breakers
  • Cleans oxidized oil from contacts
  • Ideal for cleaning electrical motor assemblies

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Part # Size Units Per Case Price Per Case Add To Cart
DEL1681

12 oz / 340 g aerosol

12 cans $394.08
Order from an authorized distributor

FAQ's

How do you use an aerosol cleaner?

Hold object to be cleaned in vertical position. Pull trigger gently to control solvent flow rate. Scrub with brush from top to bottom, allowing the liquid to flush away contaminants. 

There are a number of regulations prohibiting the use of chlorinated solvents. Should I be concerned with Trans, which is used in many of your nonflammable cleaners?

No, it should not be a concern. Many of Chemtronics' nonflammable solvents (e.g. Electro-Wash VZ, Flux-Off Tri-V) contain 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (Trans, CAS# 156-60-5), which has caused confusion. The regulations controlling chlorinated solvents do not generally pertain to Trans. The following are the reasons: Many are confused with “chloro” substances due to the NESHAP requirements. The big 3 chlorinated substances are Perchloroethylene (Perc), Trichloroethylene (TCE), and methylene chloride. The association of those with all chlorinated substances is not valid. NESHAP requirements only refer to restrictions of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP). Of the nearly 200 substances listed as HAP’s, Trans is not on that list. Reference the following link: https://www.epa.gov/haps/initial-list-hazardous-air-pollutants-modifications. Trans has the same exposure limit (per ACGIH) time-weighted average (TWA) as 2-propanol (IPA) -- 200 ppm. In contrast, n-Propyl Bromide (nPB) is commonly used in vapor degreasers, with TWA established by ACGIH of 10 ppm. It has been proposed to be reduced to 0.1 ppm. nPB is also listed on various carcinogen lists, notably Prop 65.

How do I properly dispose of an aerosol can after it is empty?

It may be different state-by-state, so contact your state environmental agency for regional specific regulations. For a general guideline, here is the process according to EPA hazardous waste regulations 40CFR. The can has to be brought to or approach atmospheric pressure to render the can empty. Puncturing is not required, only that it “approach atmospheric pressure”, i.e. empty the can contents until it’s no longer pressurized. This insures that as much contents as is reasonably possible are out of the can. It is then considered “RCRA-empty”. At that point it can be handled as any other waste metal container, generally as scrap metal under the recycling rules. Note that the can is still considered a solid waste at this point (not necessarily hazardous waste).

Is there something I can do with the extension tube (straw) so it doesn’t get lost?

The red cap on Chemtronics aerosol products like flux removers, degreasers, and Freeze-It Freeze Spray has a notch on the top. That is engineered for the straw to snap in and hold into place so you don’t loose it. The aerosol trigger sprayers that are common on dusters, freeze sprays, and flux removers, have two ways to store the straw when not in use. The hole at the back of the body of the sprayer is just the right size for the straw to slide into place for storage. The slot below the trigger is also the right size for the straw to snap into place, which also has the advantage of locking the trigger.

How do I figure out the shelf life of a product?

The shelf life of a product can be found on either the technical data sheet (TDS), available on the product page, or by looking on the certificate on conformance (COC). The COC can be downloaded by going to https://www.chemtronics.com/coc. Once you have the shelf life, you will need to add it to the manufacture date for a use-by date. The manufacture date can be identified by the batch number. The batch code used on most of our products are manufacture dates in the Julian Date format. The format is YYDDD, where YY = year, DDD = day. For example, 19200 translates to the 200th day of 2019, or July 19, 2019. This webpage explains and provides charts to help interpret our batch numbers: https://www.chemtronics.com/batch-codes.

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